Culture

Chinese Valentines Day – for 2017 falls on 28th August

Every year on the seventh day of the seventh month of the lunar calendar is Chinese Valentine’s Day “七夕节(Qīxījié).” This year the date is Monday 28th August. As is the custom elsewhere in the world, this is a day devoted to romance.
What is Chinese Valentines Day?

The Double Seven Festival (aka Qixi Festival) is recognized as Chinese Valentine’s Day for its romantic legend about two stars: Altair and Vega. Altair is said to be Niu Lang (a poor but industrious cowherd), Vega is said to be Zhi Nü (the seventh daughter of the lord of heaven), and a romantic love story is told of the two.

Chinese traditions

In China, people have celebrated the festival differently in various regions. In China’s southwestern region, girls paint their fingernails, hoping for their Mr Rights. Women in Hunan and Zhejiang province wash their hair in order to gain the goddess’s protection. One famous activity is to eat 巧果(qiǎoguŏ).

Celebrating today

Chinese people have adopted the traditions of Westerners on celebrating Valentine’s Day, such as exchanging gifts like flowers, chocolates, ties and watches, making a special date to have a romantic dinner or watch a movie in the evening, or even to make a marriage registration if Valentine’s Day falls on a work day.

Lavender is associated with love and romance. In time for Chinese Valentines Day, Bridestowe Lavender gift packs have been released. Qixi – brought to you by the world-famous Bobbie the Bridestowe Bear – is loved by Chinese celebrities everywhere! 

Compliments of community member Kylie Leavitt – use discount code KL25 for 25% off.

情人节快乐 (Happy Valentine’s Day): qíng-rén-jié kuài-lè or /ching-rnn-jyeh kwhy-ler/

Exporting our film capabilities to China

China's Palace Museum
China’s Palace Museum

Culture is an integral part of any community and China is no different. One of the ways this can be expressed is through  films.

Movie going is expanding rapidly in China with the rise of middle-class incomes. Currently, there at 30,000 screens in China vs 39,000 in the US with 15 being built every day, included in most shopping complexes. A trip to the cinema is an annual event in China vs four times a year in the US, so there is enormous market potential. Continue reading Exporting our film capabilities to China